Disqualified Drivers Insurance.co.uk

Which Driving Offences in the UK Lead to a Disqualification?

It is estimated that around 200,000 to 250,000 motorists are disqualified from driving each year for various driving offences. Many of these motorists are disqualified for repeatedly committing minor offences. Others are automatically disqualified after committing serious driving offences that could cause bodily harm or property damage.

With these thoughts in mind, have a look below at the some of the most common driving offences that lead to driver disqualification in the UK.

--One of the most common driving offences that lead to driver disqualification is driving well beyond a posted speed limit.

It is estimated by the Ministry of Transport that nearly 15,000 motorists are disqualified each year for driving well beyond a posted speed limit. The length of these disqualifications usually varies from 56 days up to 6 months.

Motorists are usually disqualified when they are caught driving more than 50 kilometres per hour (yes, you use metrics) above a posted speed limit. However, if law enforcement officials believe you were endangering yourself or others whilst speeding, you could also be disqualified for driving 25 to 30 kilometres per hour above a posted speed limit if the circumstances warrant such a move.

--Another common driving offence that leads to driver disqualification is driving while under the influence of alcohol.

It is estimated by the Ministry of Transport that about 12,000-18,000 motorists are disqualified each year for driving while under the influence of alcohol. The average length of these disqualifications ranges from 12 months up to 36 months. However, first time offenders can regain their driving licences in less time if they attend a special drink driving course.

Motorists are disqualified for this offence if they are caught driving a motorised vehicle while having at least 35 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath or at least 80 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood in their bodies.

Tests to determine these alcohol levels must be performed by a police officer either at the scene of the alleged offence or at the police station. Moreover, the UK has special laws that require police officers to perform these tests only if there’s reasonable cause to suspect that the motorist is driving under the influence of alcohol.

--One other common driving offence that can lead to driver disqualification is repeatedly committing minor traffic offences.

This type of driving offence is called “Totting Up.” It is estimated by the Ministry of Transport that around 22,000 motorists lose their driving licence each year for habitually breaking minor traffic laws such as seat belt regulations or parking regulations. The length of time for these disqualifications varies from up to 6 months for your first offence and two years for your third offence.

These offences occur when you collect at least 12 penalty points over a two year period for breaking minor traffic laws. Very often offenders are caught when they commit very minor matters such parking offences and suspicious police officers investigate further. Therefore, it might be a good idea to obey local traffic regulations if you want to keep your licence .

In fact, because there are many motoring offences that can lead to disqualification, it might be a good idea to obey all of the UK’s traffic and motoring laws - if they don't get you with one, they'll get you with another. Drive carefully!